Lucky Blow by Amanda Washington #Review

Lucky Blow by Amanda Washington #ReviewLucky Blow by Amanda Washington

Genres: Urban Fantasy
Published by Indie/Self Published on September 26, 2016
Pages: 190
Format: eARC
Source: Author
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four-stars      three-flames

From the outset, Lucky Blow had me smirking and rolling my eyes at the droll humor that this trouble magnet heroine slams down both to amuse and gloss over the tough, hard life she calls her own.  Greek myth come to life when gods, goddesses, demi-gods, and legends walk among us.  And just as in times past, they are capricious and self-centered.  Life is never easy nor can it be anticipated.  To survive one must be tough and cunning- or maybe imbued with the magic of luck in Romi’s case.

This book did the job of setting up a delightful world full of adventure, passion, and wry humor as Romi, her son’s manny, a griffin named Tweety, and her son’s father set out on a quest to restore a situation on Mt. Olympus that Romi might have artlessly created when she made a deal with a couple of gods for her freedom.  Her young son is being held hostage until she recovers Zeus’ essence which was stolen from him with the help of a mighty sword dusted with her magic luck.

On this quest, she must learn to be a team player and trust the two that are with her particularly the handsome Demarco who captivates her at every turn.  The trouble is that from her earlier years, Romi had it beaten into her that she must be strong, show no weakness, and never-ever trust anyone.  So Demarco coming along and wanting to know her scare her worse than the darkness that tracks them and the powerful gods who would stop her from her quest.

Alright, yes, this was exciting from page one.  Romi is a master thief and has been raised by a dark creature in the shadows.  She is of the shadows and she is enslaved all her life.  So a deal with a couple of gods sounds rather good.  This story had a swashbuckling quality to it so it has a light and humorous tone even while covering some action-packed scenes and moments of deep introspection.  It clips right along as it leans toward an action plot, but is balanced with some good character and romance development, too.

The story is told first person narrative from Romi’s perspective.  She is quick, bright, and observant though her personal perspective is skewed by her past.  She has to have this tight grip on control and can get bossy and prickly as a result.  This book was an introduction to a series that will follow her and the others on the quest so there is plenty of growing room for Romi.  She is just starting to tentatively reach out to Demarco and I look forward to seeing her strengthen and grow as she learns to open up and work with others.

Demarco is not as developed in this story and that is because until Romi came along his life was confined.  He’s practically a blank slate in ways and innocent to the world and the gods, but for all that, he is grounded and settled.  He quietly anchors Romi even as he gives her her head on matters much of the time.  I look forward to him winning her over and proving his worth as his talents and skills as a son of Hephaestus emerge.

And then there is Tweety.  He is the delight of this cast of characters.  He’s a griffin and can shift into human form.  He was sent to Romi to watch out after her and Demarco’s son and even when she freed him from the slave collar, he stayed on.  He’s a young effervescent teenager, but he is loyal and considers Romi and Dorean his family.  He makes a fun sidekick on the venture.

But let’s not forget that pantheon of gods and goddesses and others all straight out of mythology.  I had a good time whenever one of them enters the scene because they certainly keep Romi and the others on their toes.

In summary, this blend of action, humor, character growth, a sprinkling of passion, and a worthy quest make this a strong opening to a series that urban fantasy and paranormal romance fans should both be reaching for.

My thanks to the author for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

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I was born and raised near Sacramento, CA. I have read since I was four years old and developed tastes that run the gamut of literature. I went away to college and have a degree in education, a certificate in family history research, and a certificate in social work. I worked for a non-profit agency with low income families for 20 years which included being responsible for the children’s library and promoting/teaching adult literacy. I have lived in Southeast Michigan for the last 18 years and I am currently a book addicted homemaker with a cat and husband who keep me grounded. Recently, I made it a challenge to review each book that I have read as a favor to author friends who said reviews are important. I have done reviews for Good Reads, Amazon, eBay, and Smashwords, but mostly at Goodreads and Amazon.

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  • Amanda Washington

    Thank you for your review!

    • Happy to read your book, Amanda. It was a hoot! 🙂

  • Tweety sounds adorbs!!

    Happy weekend!

    • He really was. He was capable and energetic and had a way of teaching the others to not take themselves too seriously.

      You have a good weekend, too, Braine!

  • OH. I Absolutely adore Greek Myth, another book featuring it?

    Being raised by shadows is different o.o

    • Yep, another book with Greek mythology as a strong element. The whole series, I think.

      Yes, I don’t quite understand the whole shadow thing, but it’s part of her magic, too.

    • Amanda Washington

      Romi’s grandfather is Erebus (the god of darkness and shadows).

  • Eek…this sounds good and need to meet Tweety.

    • I would like to take credit for discovery, but it found me. However, I wasn’t far in and realized this was going to be fun. Yes, Tweety is a must. 🙂

  • Well that sounds like a very good time. I love when a secondary character like Tweety hooks me 😀

    • It was definitely a fun read. I agree, secondary characters that are strong and memorable make the book just as much as the main ones.