Review: Mercy Thompson: Moon Called Volume One & Two

Review: Mercy Thompson: Moon Called Volume One & TwoMercy Thompson: Moon Called Volume One by Patricia Briggs

Series: Mercy Thompson #1
Genres: Urban Fantasy
Published by Ace on March 2, 2010
Pages: 336
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four-stars  

I love the world of Patricia Briggs’ Mercy Thompson series so when I discovered that there was a graphic novel that coincided with her first novel in the series I had to jump up and get it.  I am not terribly familiar with graphic novels and my review will probably reflect this.

The storyline is basically that a young girl mechanic runs her own shop in the Tri-cities area of Washington state.  She is not just a mechanic, but also a rare coyote shifter.  Mercy is not alone because there is a whole supernatural community of fae, wolves, witches and vampires hiding in plain sight from the humans- well with the exception of the fae who are out of the supernatural closet.

Mercy, is approached by a teenage boy for a job.  She should turn him away because he’s obviously a runaway, but her sensitive more-than-human nose tells her that he is a newly turned werewolf and she takes pity on him.  Mercy’s action of taking in Mac sets a whole slew of events in motion that end up with shadowy agents tracking down Mac, with Mercy’s neighbor the local wolf alpha getting attacked in his home and having his daughter kidnapped and then Mercy’s adventures trying to get the girl back while being forced to confront people from her past.

This story is broken into two volumes with the first half ending right where Mercy and her accomplices are heading out from Montana back to Washington to solve to find Jessie, Adam’s daughter.  There is also a story short in the back of both that is a prequel of sorts showing how Mac came to be a werewolf.

Review: Mercy Thompson: Moon Called Volume One & TwoMercy Thompson: Moon Called Volume Two by Patricia Briggs

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four-stars  First of all, the whittling down of the storyline from the original novel was well done.  It covered all the salient points both in plot line and dialogue even though it was obviously a huge reduction in words letting the graphics tell much of the story too.  Now that being said, I did get confused a few times like in the beginning when the story started out with one scene and then went back to explain how we got there.  Personally, I think it would have been better just to stick to a chronological storyline.  While confusing, it didn’t detract too much, but I could see places where if I hadn’t read the novel I would be somewhat confused about the world building behind the story.

Now as to the illustrations, they were wonderful.  I had a picture in my mind of what the characters looked like and if my imaginary characters were drawn it would have been pretty close.  I loved the detail in facial expression and in the portrayal of movement.

For the fan of the Mercy Thompson series, I think this would be a real treat and a fun experience to see the characters in graphic format and ‘see’ the story unfold.  For someone who has never read the original novels, it might be alright, but the experience would be so much less so I heartily recommend reading the Moon Called novel first.

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I was born and raised near Sacramento, CA. I have read since I was four years old and developed tastes that run the gamut of literature. I went away to college and have a degree in education, a certificate in family history research, and a certificate in social work. I worked for a non-profit agency with low income families for 20 years which included being responsible for the children’s library and promoting/teaching adult literacy. I have lived in Southeast Michigan for the last 18 years and I am currently a book addicted homemaker with a cat and husband who keep me grounded. Recently, I made it a challenge to review each book that I have read as a favor to author friends who said reviews are important. I have done reviews for Good Reads, Amazon, eBay, and Smashwords, but mostly at Goodreads and Amazon.