Review: The Laird’s Forbidden Lover by Amelia C. Gormley

Review: The Laird’s Forbidden Lover by Amelia C. GormleyThe Laird’s Forbidden Lover by Amelia C. Gormley

Genres: Historical Romance, M/M Romance
Published by Riptide on May 6, 2013
Pages: 78
Format: eBook
Source: NetGalley
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four-stars  

Farm lad Iain Munro knows his love affair with Tavish MacIntyre, future Laird of Creachann-Dubh, is dangerous—discovery could mean disgrace and death. But they’ve been in love since they were boys, and they’ve never been able to resist each other, dishonorable though it is to deceive their families.

Young men now, their sexual explorations have deepened and their love for each other has strengthened. But Iain’s father fears for his eldest son’s future, and Tavish faces dangers and duties of his own: his demanding mother would see him respectably wed, and his interfering sister knows too much—and has schemes of her own.

Facing a lifetime apart, Iain and Tavish must leave their childhoods behind for good as they choose between honor and love, innocence and happiness, and their vows before God and to each other.

After I started this book, I discovered that it wasn’t quite what I thought it would be- in a good way, I might add. I was leery of the possibility that it would be filled with high doses of angst based on the premise, but it wasn’t. It was a coming of age story wrapped up in a forbidden romance that didn’t seem to have a chance at happily ever after. Once it got started, I recognized the only possible solution if they wanted to be together and was right, but even then I was still eager to read through how they got to that point. It’s a short story, but it was written well enough that I was able to connect with the characters and see a fleshed out plot. It is told in flashbacks alternating with the present and alternating between points of view so it did keep me on my toes to pay attention to the when and the who behind the narration.

The story’s backdrop is the Scottish Highlands at least a few hundred years ago (not sure of the exact period) and the dress, language and life reflect this. It opens with Tavish, the young laird in training, coming to his distant cousin, Ian’s farm to beg Ian’s da to let him go hunting with him. The permission is given and the two lovers who had broken it off come together once more. Ian broke it off out of thoughts of honor and doubts of any chance of a real future knowing that as laird, Tavish’s life would not leave room for Ian.
Ian is the thinker and Tavish more impulsive so Tavish doesn’t look ahead like Ian until he is forced to when his mother sends Ian away and makes him consider a wife. The two young men are devastated to be parted, but see no way to be together even if Tavish has no desire to wed.

All in all, it was a passionate short read that I found highly enjoyable with its historic Scot setting and seeing the two men together. I wish it could have been a bit longer because I liked the story, but it did end after all the salient parts occurred. Those who enjoy historical m/m romance should give this a try.

Thanks to Net Galley and Riptide for providing the book for review purposes.

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I was born and raised near Sacramento, CA. I have read since I was four years old and developed tastes that run the gamut of literature. I went away to college and have a degree in education, a certificate in family history research, and a certificate in social work. I worked for a non-profit agency with low income families for 20 years which included being responsible for the children’s library and promoting/teaching adult literacy. I have lived in Southeast Michigan for the last 18 years and I am currently a book addicted homemaker with a cat and husband who keep me grounded. Recently, I made it a challenge to review each book that I have read as a favor to author friends who said reviews are important. I have done reviews for Good Reads, Amazon, eBay, and Smashwords, but mostly at Goodreads and Amazon.