Yakkety Yak Let’s Chat: Audio Books, love ’em or hate ’em?

Posted February 24, 2013 by Shari in Yakkety Yak Let's Chat / 0 Comments

Yakkety Yak Let's Chat

Ready for another Yakkety Yak Sunday Chat? Well let’s talk about audio books for a moment. I really have a love affair lately with audio books. I created an account on Audible about 8 months ago when I started walking. Thinking I could get some exercise, but still get in my “reading” I signed up for a monthly credit. But then I couldn’t find much I wanted to download. For a while the credits started building up until I forced myself to use them. The second reason I started audio books was I was told first person stories are easier to tolerate on audio versus reading.

One of the first books I downloaded was Darkfever by Karen Marie Moning. I tried listening to it as I walked thinking I could get past the first person POV. So far I haven’t finished the book. I hear nothing but good things about it so I think I just need to go back and try it again.

Switching gears a little in the genre, I went with Maya Banks Sweet Series. While I loved listening to this series, I found myself not taking notes to critical plot points. So when it came time for me to write reviews, I struggled a lot. In fact, I haven’t written a review of one of these books that I will probably have listen to again.

So that brings me to my biggest issue with audio books. It’s not as easily to select quotes you want to reference like an ebook. I find myself trying to listen again to find where I found something of interest. The biggest problem…if I don’t get the review written right away, I tend to forget it. When I read, I have a better memory as I am focused on reading. When I am listening, I am usually doing something else, like driving. I will get to a point in the book and think, when did we get to the other side of the town. Did I miss something as I as figuring out what lane to get in?

So over time I have come up with two ways I use audio books now. The first way is that I am just listening to the book for pure enjoyment and have no plans to write a review of it. This has taken the pressure off me to just enjoy the story without having to try to remember all the little things that I want to note.

The second way I use audio books is to supplement my reading. Recently I started reading Shannon Stacey’s Kowalski Family series. When I took a road trip, I listened to the first two hours of the book. When we stopped, I started reading the book on my Kindle. When we left, I went back to the audio book and listened to two more hours. Once home, I was gobbling the book up because I couldn’t get enough of it. This way I was able to make notes as I was reading the ebook but also make progress in the story as I killed time driving.

So do you listen to audio books? Exclusively or along with ebooks? What are your thoughts on audio books? Do you think they will become a bigger medium of book delivery? Even bigger than ebooks?

Yakkety Yak Let’s Chat!

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Shari is the Delighted Reader. Married to her Prince Charming and mother to two Princesses and one Prince. When she is not slaving away as Cinderella she loves to get lost in the pages of a good book. Never without a reading device and a few good paperback books, because she never knows when she might get 5 minutes to read!

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  • Krista

    I like to listen to books that I’ve already read. My attention span is too short to listen to anything new.

    • I totally understand that! Reading sticks with me, but audio seems to come and go out of my mind!

  • Sophia Rose

    I have only listened to a couple of books when I was doing tedious chores like dishes or ironing which was not a problem for me to pay attention. I agree about retaining a better memory of the stories that I read better than the stories I hear.

    • I love reading and I thought audio would be a fun to get into audio books. But I find myself forgetting or getting distracted as I listen!

  • I adore audiobooks! I’ve had my Audible.com account for over 2 1/2 years now and own 164 of them so far. lol I’m bouncing up and down every month when it’s my 2 credits day. I do have a lot of ebooks with the audiobooks but mostly I listen them. I think audiobooks will be as big as ebooks but I doubt they will surpass them.

    • I wish I could love it like you do! I get one credit a month, but I only want to use it on $20 audio books, lol. I tend to buy any that are under $10 outright. I have about 20 in my library right now. I just don’t get enough time to listen like I do reading.

      I am still trying to talk my mom into audible since she buys a lot of books on CD which gets expensive.

  • Anne

    I don’t feel you can listen to an audiobook and do a review. I do think you start doing other things and don’t pay as much attention to what you’re hearing. I love audio books in the car and at work unless I doing financial stuff, then I can’t really pay attention to the book.

    • I feel the same way. At least when I am listening and reading the same book, I can seem to retain it enough to do a good review. But a review only on an audible book? Well I better have written it right as I got done with it our it won’t stick with me long.

      I only tend to listen to books if I am driving over an hour. It’s better than being alone with silence.

  • Manuel Kreighbaum

    Listening to audio books is practical and it meets the busy lifestyle of contemporary people. You can tune in to your favorite books anytime anywhere, while you are walking, sh… The popularity of iPod and MP3 players has raised the marketplace of audiobooks in recent years. Some book publishers also believed that audio books could outsell paperback books or e-books one day. Indeed, this pattern is clear if you think about some great benefits of audio books over paperback books. .

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  • Lachelle Kaelker

    The evolution and use of audiobooks in Germany closely parallels that of the US. A special example of its use is the West German Audio Book Library for the Blind, founded in 1955. Actors from the municipal theater in Münster recorded the first audio books for the visually impaired in an improvised studio lined with egg cartons. ‘,*”

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