Riptide Anniversary

Posted October 27, 2015 by Sophia Rose in Book Tour / 45 Comments

Tags:

Riptide Anniversary

 

Thank you for joining Riptide on our 4th Anniversary blog tour! We are excited to bring you new guest posts from our authors and behind the scenes insights from Riptide. The full tour schedule can be found at http://riptidepublishing.com/events/tours/riptides-4th-anniversary-celebration. Don’t miss the limited time discounts and Free Books for a Year giveaway at the end of this post!

Please welcome Charlie Cochrane to the tour.

I’m obsessed with the era either side of 1900. To the extent that if I buy (or borrow from the library) any new books set in the era I have to smuggle them into the house in a plain brown wrapper or my daughters tell me off. I try to pretend they’re for research purposes (I write many of my stories in the Edwardian/WWI era) but that’s stretching the truth. It’s the characters who fascinate me. Sassoon, Owen, Brooke, Graves, Gurney and the rest – I can lap up both their works and their life stories.

Okay, you might say, that’s all very well setting a context for your writing but how does the romantic element work in? The simple answer is that Siegfried Sassoon was gay, Wilfred Owen was gay, Rupert Brooke and Robert Graves had experienced homosexual encounters/longings, Vera Brittain’s brother Edward might have sacrificed himself in the line as he was under suspicion of sexual relations with his soldiers1…the list goes on. Scratch the surface of almost any of the WWI poets and you find some connection (personal or through friends) to what would have been, at the time, a deliberately hidden world of gay men. Edward Carpenter’s2 book “The Intermediate Sex” was published just six years before WWI began and he was an influence on both Sassoon and Graves3.

It’s a strange era, with a bit of a dichotomous feel. On the one hand the disgrace of Oscar Wilde would still have been sharp in the nation’s memory but Robert Ross, Wilde’s lover and staunch supporter, still had a sort of coterie in London where several of these poets congregated4. (Owen, whose one extant letter to Sassoon suggests he was in love with him, got drawn into this network after meeting Sassoon at Craiglockhart.)

Inevitably, given the illegal status of homosexual relationships, cover ups were ripe. Edward Brittain’s commanding officer kept the story of his impending enquiry secret until he was attacked in print by Vera Brittain. Sassoon’s autobiographical novels skirt around his sexuality and he destroyed some of Owen’s letters to him for which the poet’s brother Harold was grateful. Harold did much (through both his own biography of his brother and destroying much of Wilfred’s correspondence) to sanitise the poet’s image; I wonder what he thought about Wilfred’s poem on the subject of rent boys, “Who is the God of Canongate”?

Because of the secrecy gay men had to live under, mysteries remain, some of which we may never be able to solve. Did Edward Brittain deliberately choose death in combat over disgrace? Was Wilfred Owen seduced by Charles Scott Moncrieff? Was the death by drowning of Michael Llewelyn Davies part of a suicide pact? How can we understand the lives of gay men at a century’s remove? Read the most up to date biographies, clearly, especially those which rely on first hand sources. (Dominic Hibberd’s “Wilfred Owen a new biography” is one of my brown paper wrapped books.) Access correspondence from the time, and look at the changing drafts of the poems6. Read the finished poems themselves, with the gift of hindsight. Maybe you’ll end up like me, so inspired by the tales you’ve heard that you’ll want to write about the era.

  1. The name Gurney, featured in Lessons for Sleeping Dogs, comes from Harry – the cricketer – not Ivor the poet.

1 http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FWWbrittainE.htm

2 http://www.exploringsurreyspast.org.uk/themes/people/writers/edward_carpenter

3http://www.bbc.co.uk/southyorkshire/content/articles/2008/11/10/edward_carpenter_siegfried_sassoon_feature.shtml

4 http://www.siegfried-sassoon.co.uk/

5 http://www.star-dot-star.co.uk/books/Pemberton.html

6 http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/ww1lit/collections/document/5189/4532

 

About the Cambridge Fellows Mysteries

If the men of St. Bride’s College knew what Jonty Stewart and Orlando Coppersmith got up to behind closed doors, the scandal would rock early-20th-century Cambridge to its core. But the truth is, when they’re not busy teaching literature and mathematics, the most daring thing about them isn’t their love for each other—it’s their hobby of amateur sleuthing.

Because wherever Jonty and Orlando go, trouble seems to find them. Sunny, genial Jonty and prickly, taciturn Orlando may seem like opposites. But their balance serves them well as they sift through clues to crimes, and sort through their own emotions to grow closer. But at the end of the day, they always find the truth . . . and their way home together.

http://riptidepublishing.com/titles/universe/cambridge-fellows-mysteries

About Charlie Cochrane

As Charlie Cochrane couldn’t be trusted to do any of her jobs of choice—like managing a rugby team—she writes, with titles published by Carina, Samhain, Bold Strokes, MLR and Cheyenne.

Charlie’s Cambridge Fellows Series of Edwardian romantic mysteries was instrumental in her being named Author of the Year 2009 by the review site Speak Its Name. She’s a member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association, Mystery People, International Thriller Writers Inc and is on the organising team for UK Meet for readers/writers of GLBT fiction. She regularly appears with The Deadly Dames.

Connect with Charlie:

 

Anniversary Sale

Riptide’s Cambridge Fellows Mysteries are being sold in a special discounted bundle by Riptide this week only. Check out the sale on this series and other bundles at http://www.riptidepublishing.com/anniversary-sale

Giveaway

To celebrate our anniversary, Riptide Publishing is giving away free books for a year! Your first comment at each blog stop on the Anniversary Tour will count as an entry and give you a chance to win this great prize. Giveaway ends at midnight, October 31, 2015, and is not restricted to US entries.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

0 0 vote
Article Rating
The following two tabs change content below.
I was born and raised near Sacramento, CA. I have read since I was four years old and developed tastes that run the gamut of literature. I went away to college and have a degree in education, a certificate in family history research, and a certificate in social work. I worked for a non-profit agency with low income families for 20 years which included being responsible for the children’s library and promoting/teaching adult literacy. I have lived in Southeast Michigan for the last 18 years and I am currently a book addicted homemaker with a cat and husband who keep me grounded. Recently, I made it a challenge to review each book that I have read as a favor to author friends who said reviews are important. I have done reviews for Good Reads, Amazon, eBay, and Smashwords, but mostly at Goodreads and Amazon.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
45 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
penguins106
penguins106
4 years ago

Happy anniverary

Stephanie Faris
4 years ago

Happy anniversary. How sad that people had to go to such lengths to live a lie. It was bad enough 30 years ago when people just couldn’t be open about their sexuality without getting strange looks. Back then, you could actually die over it.

Stephanie
http://stephie5741.blogspot.com

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago

It’s so sad, isn’t it? Makes me cross that people can’t just be true to themselves.

Lily B
4 years ago

wow thats a lot of secrets D:

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago
Reply to  Lily B

Isn’t it just?

onlysixofusinmyhead
onlysixofusinmyhead
4 years ago

Happy Anniversary. I love M/M historical

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago

There is something wonderful about immersing oneself in the past.

trix23
trix23
4 years ago

I’ve always found m/m historicals much more compelling than m/f ones, and it’s likely for the reasons you’ve mentioned. I’m Trix in the Rafflecopter…

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago
Reply to  trix23

Same here! xx

Alex Jane
Alex Jane
4 years ago

This is a lovely piece. I loved these poets when we got to read them in school and will definitely revisit them with fresh eyes. As for you having to suruptitiously smuggle accounts of their lives into the house…not sure if that’s fitting, or whether to encourage you to make a stand like they never could : ) x

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago
Reply to  Alex Jane

LOL We are temporarily empty nesting so I have a little stock up…
There is a great online archive of all Owen’s poems, finished and unfinished.

Suzi Webster
Suzi Webster
4 years ago

Thanks for these thoughts Charlie, definitely an era where we wont ever know what exactly these men went through.

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago
Reply to  Suzi Webster

Yes, exactly.

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago
Reply to  Suzi Webster

Yes, exactly.

Lisa S
Lisa S
4 years ago

I agree that it’s sad when people have to hide who they are to survive. Especially in this supposedly “enlightened” age. Thanks for your insight.

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago
Reply to  Lisa S

*nods* Yes, this hasn’t exactly gone away, has it. Looking at latest news ref gay footballers reluctant to come out is a case in point.

RO
RO
4 years ago

Wow! This sounds sounds like really amazing info and I love it! What an awesome topic! Hugs…Ro

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago
Reply to  RO

Thanks!

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago
Reply to  RO

Thanks!

Sophia Rose
4 years ago

I’ve read a lot of historical same-sex romance and historical fiction and seen some historical biographies on TV, but its not the same thing for me looking back as they had to live it. You gave me a sense of that here. Thanks, Charlie!

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago
Reply to  Sophia Rose

My pleasure, Sophia

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago
Reply to  Sophia Rose

My pleasure, Sophia

Rodney Batterman
Rodney Batterman
4 years ago

Great post. Happy Anniversary Riptide!

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago

Thanks, Rodney.

Lover Of Romance
4 years ago

Look at this fun info here!!! Very informative and straight to the point. Happy Anniversary riptide.

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago

Hear hear!

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago

Hear hear!

kimbacaffeinate
4 years ago

Great post Charlie!! Happy Anniversary Riptide!!

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago

Thanks, my dear

Lola
4 years ago

Happy anniversary to Riptide! I haven’t read many books set in the 1900 so far, although when I took history classes I always found the time between WW1 and WW2 very interesting. I might have to see if I can find some books set then. I always found history interesting and it’s interesting to imagine how people lived back then and how different things are then now.

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago
Reply to  Lola

That contrast is fascinating.

Lira
Lira
4 years ago

It’s really sad to think about how much has been hidden or destroyed because of these coverups.

Phil
4 years ago

Charlie, that’s very interesting. As a pacifist, I find the WW I poets intensely moving, but never knew they were gay. (Phil your narrator.)

penguins106
penguins106
4 years ago

Happy anniverary

Stephanie Faris
4 years ago

Happy anniversary. How sad that people had to go to such lengths to live a lie. It was bad enough 30 years ago when people just couldn’t be open about their sexuality without getting strange looks. Back then, you could actually die over it.

Stephanie
http://stephie5741.blogspot.com

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago

It’s so sad, isn’t it? Makes me cross that people can’t just be true to themselves.

Lily B
4 years ago

wow thats a lot of secrets D:

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago
Reply to  Lily B

Isn’t it just?

trix23
trix23
4 years ago

I’ve always found m/m historicals much more compelling than m/f ones, and it’s likely for the reasons you’ve mentioned. I’m Trix in the Rafflecopter…

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago
Reply to  trix23

Same here! xx

onlysixofusinmyhead
onlysixofusinmyhead
4 years ago

Happy Anniversary. I love M/M historical

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago

There is something wonderful about immersing oneself in the past.

Alex Jane
Alex Jane
4 years ago

This is a lovely piece. I loved these poets when we got to read them in school and will definitely revisit them with fresh eyes. As for you having to suruptitiously smuggle accounts of their lives into the house…not sure if that’s fitting, or whether to encourage you to make a stand like they never could : ) x

Charlie Cochrane
Charlie Cochrane
4 years ago
Reply to  Alex Jane

LOL We are temporarily empty nesting so I have a little stock up…
There is a great online archive of all Owen’s poems, finished and unfinished.

Kimberly Caffeinated Reviewer

Great post Charlie!! Happy Anniversary Riptide!!